The World – Duty first though the judgement has come – January 7, 2021

The 19th of May, 1788, was a very dark day in Connecticut. Candles were lighted in many houses; the birds went to roost. The people were greatly impressed that the judgement day had come. In the state legislature, at that time in session in Hartford, this opinion prevailed. The house of representatives adjourned, and the council proposed to follow the example.

But Colonel Davenport objected. “The day of judgement,” he said, “is either approaching or it is not. If it is not, there is no cause for an adjournment; if it is, I choose to be found doing my duty. I wish, therefore, that candles may be brought.”

Is not this the spirit that should prompt us in every act that we do? May we so carry out our duty that even the day of judgement, should it arrest our action, will find us doing only that which is right and honorable before men and God.

Excerpts from “Answered prayers and soul-winning incidents – published in 1940


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